Successful Partnership Schools Being Closed

Years: 7- 13 co-educational
Roll: 208
Priority students: 100% Maori roll
Sponsor: He Puna Marama Charitable Trust
Leader: Raewyn Tipene
Principal: Stanko Susnjar

Te Kura Hourua o Whangarei Terenga Paraoa, Whangarei

Est. 2014

This kura is modelled on the values and legacy of A Company of the 28th Māori Battalion and tikanga Maori. Its patron, Charlie Petera, who passed away last year, was the last surviving member of the A Company.  The school’s goals are:

                                    Be Māori                         Kia Maori                           

                                   Be Educated                   Kia Mātau

                                   Be Rangatira                   Kia Tū Rangatira

After four years in operation, the school has achieved quite outstanding academic results. Across Levels 1 to 3 of NCEA and UE, it scored well above the national averages for both Decile 1-3 schools and for Decile 1-10 schools and well above the national achievement averages for Māori students.  It is the second ranking school in Northland for UE success in 2017. It has very high attendance levels. In addition to focusing on further lifting academic achievement, the kura has a rich programme of cultural, korero, language and leadership development.

 

Three of its senior students, Aotea Parata, Grace Barry and Hineira Komene (pictured), headed overseas last year for year-long Rotary Youth Exchange scholarships in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Bornheim, Germany, and St Gallen, Switzerland. 

TKW - Terenga Paraoa89.4%90.9%71.4%64.3%
TKW - Terenga Paraoa (Maori)89.3%90.9%71.4%64.3%
All NZ Maori64.8%76.8%58.6%32.8%
All NZ (Decile 1-3)66.8%75.6%58.7%29.4%
All NZ (Decile 1-10)75.1%79.8%67.4%50.2%

Years: 1- 6 co-educational
Roll: 110
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: He Puna Marama Charitable Trust
Leader: Raewyn Tipene
Principal: Hoana Te Aika

Te Kāpehu Whetū - Teina, Whangarei

Est. 2015

This full immersion te reo Māori school primarily draws from the sponsor’s two local early childhood centres. It was established to complete the Trust’s offering of the Te Kāpehū Whetū Māori education concept covering early childhood education through to young adults. The kura moved from National Standards to Ngā Whanaketanga Rumaki Māori in 2016.

With one exception (at year 4) its results for 2016 were well above national averages in every subject, and the school reported 100% attendance and engagement (no unjustified absences or disciplinary actions taken).

Years: 1- 8 co-educational
Roll: 107
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: The Rise UP Trust
Leader & Principal: Sita Selupe MNZM

The Rise UP Academy, Mangere East

Est. 2014

This Pasifika-focused primary school started as a Saturday morning home school run in a garage. Its founder and leader Sita Selupe was named NEXT Magazine’s Woman of the Year in 2014, a Blake Leader Award Recipient in 2015 and made an MNZM in last year’s New Year’s Honours for services to education and Māori and Pasifika communities.  The school’s mission is Raising leaders, one child at a time, and its objectives are to develop Sharp minds, strong bodies, and good hearts. Among the school’s hallmarks is an integrated and highly rated programme for fanau on how to help their children do well at school.

With two exceptions (year 2 reading and year 8 writing), Rise UP’s 2016 National Standards results at all year levels and across all subjects were well above the national average and significantly above national results for decile 3 schools.

Years: 11- 13 co-educational
Roll: 190
Priority students: 75%
Sponsor: Advance Training Group Ltd
Leader: Nick Hyde
Principal: Rockley Montgomery

Vanguard Military School

Est. 2014

After operating for 4 years, Vanguard has established itself as one of the top ten highest performing schools in Auckland.  Its academic results have been outstanding and its reputation for instilling pride and confidence in its students and assisting them onto solid career pathways is a matter of record.

Using a military ethos as its ‘exoskeleton’, with a strong focus on order, discipline, physical fitness and a powerfully articulated code of honour, the school has been able to engage successfully with students who had failed or were at risk of failing in the regular state education system.

2017 Results (Roll based)Level 1 NCEALevel 2 NCEALevel 3 NCEAUE
Vanguard Military School84.2%93.1%96.2%44.2%
All NZ Maori64.8%76.6%58.6%32.8%
All NZ (Decile 1-3)66.8%75.6%58.7%29.4%
All NZ (Decile 1-10)75.1%79.8%67.4%50.2%

Vanguard’s NCEA results are exemplary with all of their results comfortably exceeding the average for all NZ Schools (Decile 1-10). Their UE results exceed those for all Decile 1-3 schools by a comfortable margin. School leaver data for 2017 is not due to be published by the Ministry of Education until mid-July 2018.

Years: 9-13 co-educational
Roll: 140
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: Pacific Peoples’ Advancement Trust
Leader: La’auli Sir Michael Jones    
Principals: Falefatu and Parehuia Enari

Pacific Advance Senior School, Otahuhu, Auckland

Est. 2015

 Pacific Advance Senior School (PASS) is New Zealand’s first senior secondary school established by Pasifika for Pasifika. It aims to provide fanau with a vaka (vehicle) built on Pasifika values and world view and designed to meet the unique learning needs of Pasifika students.

In its first three years of operating PASS has not yet been able to achieve its contracted academic outcomes for leaver-based NCEA results. The school reports that many of its students are up to 2 to 4 years behind their age level in terms of learning and skills, and a large proportion come from very challenging and unstable home lives

PASS has focused intensively on pastoral care, including basic matters such as finding a bed for the night, and bringing students up to a level where they can participate in NCEA. The school has very strong student attendance and engagement and rated very positively in the Wellbeing@school survey. PASS’s expansion in 2018 to years 9 and 10 aims to equip students with strong foundational skills, in particular in literacy and numeracy, to better prepare them for NCEA and future educational pathways.

 

2017 Results (Roll based)Level 1 NCEALevel 2 NCEALevel 3 NCEAUE
PASS52.4%42.3%47.2%2.8%
All NZ Maori64.8%76.8%58.6%32.8%
All NZ (Decile 1-3)66.8%75.6%58.7%29.4%
All NZ (Decile 1-10)75.1%79.8%67.4%50.2%

Years: 7-10 co-educational
Roll: 179
Priority students: 88% 
Sponsor: Villa Education Trust
Leaders: ALwyn & Karen Poole  
Principal: Wendy Greig

South Auckland Middle School, Auckland

Est. 2014

South Auckland Middle School (SAMS) offers a project-based learning model (developed by the Trust at its Mt Hobson Middle School) comprising academic learning in the morning and art, music, physical education, drama and community involvement in the afternoons.  Students have shone in external public speaking, performing arts and sports events and the school has a dedicated community liaison officer underscoring a strong focus on whanau and community engagement.  The school enjoys great support from its parent community and strong demand for places.

SAMS did not meet its student achievement standards in 2016 for years 7 and 8. (There are no system-wide measures for years 9 and 10.) It is notable that SAMS enrols children at Year 7 with e-asTTle scores confirming that these students are up to two years behind their peer level, leaving the school with two years to reach contractual performance targets. The Villa Education Trust has raised concerns about the appropriateness and achievability of current performance measures for a school offering these year levels. It has been working with the Ministry to develop additional measures to demonstrate student progress that will accurately show value-added progress across a student’s current sets of ability, and also to develop progress measures for Year 9 and 10

Years: 1-8 co-educational
Roll: 100
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: Manukau Urban Maori Authority
Leaders: Wyn Osborne
Principal: Tania Rangiheuea

Te Kura Māori o Waatea, Mangere, Auckland

Est. 2015

In line with the Kura Hourua collective impact model, Te Kura Māori o Waatea forms part of a broad suite of social services offered at the Waatea Marae, aimed at building community and lifting social and educational outcomes. Among the benefits of the concept, as noted by the ERO in 2016, is that supportive adults from all parts of the organisation play a role in building the engagement of learners and their whanau.

Following a challenging first year, the school’s leaders moved quickly to effect a turnaround in results: making more effective use of achievement data, modifying teaching strategies and practices, increasing time and emphasis on professional development and building a strong culture of teaching and learning. In its second year of operation Waatea met 9 of its 15 achievement standards (compared with just 4 of 12 in 2015), achieving between and 86% for the three National Standards subject areas. Overall results were well in excess of the national averages for decile 3 schools, and a pleasing example of what can be achieved through application of the accountability requirements under the outcomes-focused Kura Hourua model.

The Ministry of Education have indicated a mid-July publishing date for National Standards data related to 2017.

Years: 7-10 co-educational
Roll: 190
Priority students: 88% 
Sponsor: Villa Education Trust
Leaders: Alwyn & Karen Poole
Principal: Alex Metzger

Middle School West Auckland

Est. 2015

Like South Auckland Middle School (SAMS), Middle School West Auckland (MSWA) offers a project-based learning model. This school also has a dedicated community liaison officer underscoring a strong focus on whanau and community engagement.  The school enjoys strong support from its parent community and strong demand for places.

MSWA did not meet its student achievement standards in 2016 for years 7 and 8. (There are no system-wide measures for years 9 and 10.) It is notable that SAMS enrols children at Year 7 with e-asTTle scores confirming that these students are up to two years behind their peer level which leaves the school with two years to reach contractual performance targets. The Villa Education Trust has raised concerns about the appropriateness and achievability of current performance measures for a school offering these year levels. It has been working with the Ministry to develop additional measures to demonstrate student progress that will accurately show value-added progress across a student’s current sets of ability, and also to develop progress measures for Year 9 and 10.

Years: 7-13 co-educational
Roll: 160
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: Kia Ata Mai Educational Trust
Leader: Hemi Rau
Principal: Cath Rau

Te Kōpuku High, Hamilton

Est. 2017

Te Kōpuku High’s mission is Realise your greatness: He uri koe nō te hunga atua, nōu te ao.

This is a bilingual school with its own curriculum (Te Nīkau™) and a late immersion kaupapa Māori character. It was founded by Kia Ata Mai, an educational trust established in 1994 by practising teachers and school leaders seeking to develop high quality literacy programmes for Kura Kaupapa and Māori medium schools.

The school got off to a flying start, with a strong, committed team of teaching staff and a visibly high level of engagement shown by the students. Demand for the school is high and its leaders have been working with the local council through a frustrating consent process to allow them to expand the school – located in an industrial area of Hamilton – to accommodate 300 students.

Te Kopuku enrolled Years 7-9 students in 2017 which means no students were entered for NCEA and National Standards data for 2017 has not yet been published. The Ministry of Education is expected to publish National Standards data for 2017 (the first year of operation of Te Kopuku) in mid July 2018.

The Kia Ata Mai Educational Trust has invested $580,000 of its own resources into starting up the school.

MSWA did not meet its student achievement standards in 2016 for years 7 and 8. (There are no system-wide measures for years 9 and 10.) It is notable that SAMS enrols children at Year 7 with e-asTTle scores confirming that these students are up to two years behind their peer level which leaves the school with two years to reach contractual performance targets. The Villa Education Trust has raised concerns about the appropriateness and achievability of current performance measures for a school offering these year levels. It has been working with the Ministry to develop additional measures to demonstrate student progress that will accurately show value-added progress across a student’s current sets of ability, and also to develop progress measures for Year 9 and 10.

Years: 11-13 boys
Roll: 37
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: Te Aratika Charitable Trust
Leader: Ronnie Rochel
Principal: Casey Tapara

Te Aratika Academy, Hastings

Est. 2017

Te Aratika Academy was founded in 2017 by a new trust formed by Te Aratika Drilling Ltd, a civil construction firm with operations across the North Island. The mission for Te Aratika (meaning ‘the right path’) is to provide A platform for change for “atypical stars”. More recently Te Aratika Academy has drawn on the heritage and legacy of C Company of the 28th Maori Battalion in its aspiration of creating ‘men of valour’. Te Aratika Drilling has been providing youth cadetships since 1998 and had long seen the need to help young Māori and Pasifika boys get the education and life skills they need to succeed and gain employment. It has the support of Ngati Kahungungu.

The school provides the NZ Curriculum with support from Te Kura as well as vocational civil construction and infrastructure works certification with ITO partner Connexis, and mixing academic and vocational work with music composition, robotics, kapa haka and basketball. Te Aratika Drilling also provides students with supervised accommodation, work experience and skill development on Te Aratika sites during the holidays. To date 70% of Te Aratika school leavers have progressed to full time employment

As the school is attracting many high needs and at-risk youth, a number of whom have spent long periods out of school, care is being taken to manage the growing roll sustainably. 

The school is enjoying remarkable levels of student attendance and engagement.

2017 Results (Roll based - cumulative)Level 1 NCEALevel 2 NCEALevel 3 NCEAUE
Te Aratika208.3%46.2%N/AN/A
All NZ Maori64.8%76.8%58.6%32.8%
All NZ Decile 1-366.8%75.6%58.7%29.4%

Years: 1-10 
Roll: 88 (growing to 200)
Priority students: 90% 
Sponsor: Te Rangihakahaka Company Limited
Leader: Te Rangihakahaka Company Limited
Principal: Roana Bennett

Te Rangihakahaka Centre for Science and Technology, Rotorua

Est. 2018

Te Rangihakahaka was established under the holding company Te Taumata o Ngati Whakaue Iho Ake Trust as part of a wider focus on the educational well-being of Ngati Whakaue tamariki.

 

Led by Rotorua iwi, Ngāti Whakaue, Te Rangihakahaka is focused on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) as a curriculum base, infusing it with Kaupapa Māori aspirations.

 

A feature of the school is a strong focus on the professional development of its teachers and the use of data and research to inform educational practice.

The sponsor intends to sub-contract to Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu Animation College and has an existing MoU with Evaluation Associates.

Crown funding for the school is being supplemented by philanthropic support and Ngāti Whakaue’s own resources.

Years: 9-11 co-educational
Opening roll: 46 (growing to 55)
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: Te Runanga o Turanganui a kiwa
Leaders: Pene Brown and Shane Braybrook

Tūranga Tangata Rite, Gisborne

Currently contracted to open in 2019

Te Rūnanga o Tūranganui ā Kiwa was established in 1986 to promote and support the three Iwi Tūranganui ā Kiwa being Rongowhakaata, Ngāi Tāmanuhiri and Te Aitanga ā Māhaki.

Turanga Tangata Rite will complement the work of Turanga Ararau which is the tertiary provider of Te Runanga o Turanganui.

Turanga Tangata Rite will focus primarily on Māori students through a ‘by iwi for iwi’ approach.

The school’s guiding principles are:

Manaakitanga – respect and regard for one another

Whakapono – self-belief and confidence in each other

Kaitiakitanga – ownership and responsibility of success

Whanaungatanga – collaboration and unity in seeking success, and

Aroha tētahi ki tētahi – trust in one another.

The school will utilise the Runanga’s existing facilities including a classroom, gymnasium and a fully operational land-based marine farm for out-of-the-classroom activities.

Years: 9-13 co-educational
Roll: 50 (rising to 145)
Priority students: 100% 
Sponsor: Te Whare Wananga o MUMA Limited, as subsidiary of the Manukau Urban Maori Authority
Leader: Wyn Osborne

Waatea High, Manurewa, South Auckland

Currently contracted to open in 2019

Waatea High will complement the Manukau Urban Maori Authority’s (MUMA) existing early childhood education centre and primary Kura Hourua, Te Kura Māori o Waatea, to provide a complete education pathway and a further consolidation of MUMA’s collective impact model designed to lift life outcomes for urban Māori.  The school will be bilingual and have a ‘Māori for Māori’ philosophy, as well as a three-way collaborative relationship between the student, their whanau and the wharekura. It is anticipated that Year 9-12 students will be based at Manurewa Marae, with year 13 students being based at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.